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Tourism in India

Title: Tourism in India
Product features: 170 pages
Released on: Jan 2004

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Brief: Tourism is touted as one of hottest growth sectors in India. International inbound, domestic internal and outbound travel are all expected to grow in double digits for years to come. However, very little has been done to promoter tourism in India.

This report presents an overview of the sector alongwith the different segments of the tourism business, their business dynamics and the key players.This report was compiled over four months following meetings with several players from almost every segment of the tourism industry. The ETIG team met leading personalities in central and state governments as well private industry. The team traveled the main tourist circuits as well, gathering a first hand feel of the industry. Interaction with embassies and foreign travelers also often revealed insights into the industry. While data was not an issue in most sectors, the validity of that data was often unclear. The ETIG team used several sources across India and overseas consultants and market research data to compile the information.

During the compilation, the report underwent several changes, as international events came together to scatter the best-laid plans of several countries. Events like the Iraq War in March 2003 and the SARS epidemic panic as well as the ongoing terrorist threats in key tourism areas like South and South East Asia have altered the tourism map again. This report attempted to take into account these changes as well as the impact of policy changes within India that should spur tourism. This report is therefore a status report, which may be used as a complete one-stop guide to the industry and possible strategies for development.

 
CONTENTS: Tourism in India

1. Tourism Overivew..…………………………………………………………………………..10
This could be bigger than what Information Technology (IT) has done for the Indian economy. The country is sitting on a virtual goldmine with a wealth of sights, cultural exuberance, diversity of terrain and that special something that only India promises and delivers. The development of the tourism industry has all the potential of being one of the greatest growth drivers of the 21st century. But it requires a massive effort.

2. Tourism infrastructure in India ……………………………………………………….…..30
The rough and tumble of travelling to and within India makes for a sorry tale. A creaking infrastructure bursting at its seams, fuzzy government policies, the lack of right investments at the right places, chaotic support services—all look set to bring to naught the government’s tall claim of attracting five million foreign tourists to India by 2005. And the domestic tourist continues to get a raw deal

3. India’s tourism heritage ………………………………………………………...…………...43
India has everything going for it – be it a breathtaking variety of landscape, flora and fauna, historical monuments, places of abiding religious interest you name it and it’s there. The scale and scope of what the country has to offer to both domestic and foreign tourists is amazing. Just the right mix for a thriving tourism sector. And yet the story has the same woeful ending. Of opportunities lost, chances missed

4. Tourism Players…………………………………………………………….………………...56
It’s the tale of the good, the bad, and the ugly. India has a myriad variety of players in the tourism industry. But the absence of any tangible tie-ups and a strong representative body leaves a lot to be desired. Working at cross-purposes, most of the tourist agencies appear to the outsider as warring tribes. India desperately needs committed large-scale, visionary players, who look at themselves as part of a value chain, mutually dependent for their own good

5. Indian Hospitality…………………………………………………………………………….87
When you travel, you got to stay somewhere. Hotels rank first in terms of the actual spend for tourist in the value chain of a tour. Be it the premium category including 5-stars or 3-stars or the humble lodge, the hotel industry is one of the major job generators for the economy. But like tourism, the hotel industry has never been organized. The entire focus has so far been on how to net in foreigners or the high-spending domestic tourist. However, the growing middle class earning population is forcing the industry to get into a rethink mode and plans are on to set up budget hotels

6. States – Case Studies…………………………………………………………….…………..105
Think India and visions of exotic locales in Rajasthan, Goa and Kerala and arise enticingly to enchant a visitor to the magic of all that is quintessentially Orient. And yet there is much more that is waiting to be explored in this vast sub-continent. To make that possible the country would need to move away from the typical ‘the government does it all’ attitude to a greater public participation and awareness of the rich dividends tourism brings in for everyone involved .Of course, a cohesive strategy, doing away with archaic laws and brilliant innovations could open the doors to the bewildering variety the country can offer to its visitors

7. International Case Studies…………………………………………………………………123
India does not have to look very far for examples that point at its efforts to promote tourism as the proverbial case of ‘too little too late’. India has quite obviously failed to convert opportunities into action and money. The figures speak for themselves. Consider this: Dubai gets three million visitors in the 30 days that the Dubai Shopping Festival lasts. The whole of India, vastly bigger and diverse than Dubai, gets 2.6 million in 365 days. Malaysia is an example of concentrated marketing communication to its core markets of Asia, and India in particular. Singapore is able to attract hordes of visitors by enhancing its attractiveness. The success stories of the three countries speak of vision, integration and attitude

8.National Accounting for Tourism………………………………………………………...…146
This is the tough one. What is the best and the most accurate way to account for the money spent on the business of tourism and to compute the returns from the investment made? While tourism accounting in advanced economies does throw up trends and directions, the lack of similar clarity hampers a clear picture of the industry in India. Though tourism generates an average $ 4 billion per year for India, only a reasonably accurate estimate of its impact on the Indian economy will encourage players to view it as serious business

9.Government Policy……………………………………………………………...……………157
Everything is in place---the good intentions, a perfect understanding of what needs to be done for the best possible results, the erudite policy projections, impeccable strategies---and yet nothing seems to be moving with the kind of urgency that is required to forge ahead. Not surprising, since that remains the hallmark of what is better known as Indian Governance. The tourism industry in India will continue to suffer as the powers that be view it as an elitist activity and remain blind to its vast potential as an engine of growth and employment generator

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